What Experts Will Never Tell You About Your Myers-Briggs Personality Type

In my last infographic, I illustrated how your job fits into your personality. Over 150,000 people have seen the post. This just shows how people are hungry to find the “right fit” between their nurture and vocation.

This time, let me share some interesting facts for each 16 Myers-Briggs personality types. Some of these findings may surprise you. I know it did for me. Truity Psychometrics did us a favor and summarized the key findings for us.

MBTI

INFP

  • On personality trait measures, score as Artistic, Reflective, Careless, Sensitive, Flexible, and Appreciative
  • Among lest likely of all types to suffer heart disease
  • In men, among least likely to report chronic pain
  • Second highest of all types to report marital dissatisfaction
  • Among most likely to have suicidal thoughts in college
  • Tend to be more successful than the average in learning a foreign language
  • Among types most likely to be dissatisfied with their work
  • Personal values include Autonomy and Creativity
  • Overrepresented in occupations in counseling, writing, and the arts
  • Best book for INFP: Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking (by Susan Cain)

INFJ

  • Least common type in the population
  • On personality trait scales, scored as Sincere, Sympathetic, Unassuming, Submissive, Easygoing, Reserved, and Patient
  • Among highest of all types in college GPA
  • Among most likely to stay in college
  • Most likely of all types to cope with stress by seeing a therapist
  • Highest of all types in marital dissatisfaction
  • Personal values include Spirituality, Learning, and Community Service
  • Commonly found in careers in religion, counseling, teaching and the arts
  • Best book for INFJ: Man’s Search for Meaning (by Viktor Frankl)

INTJ

  • On personality trait measures, score as Discreet, Industrious, Logical, Deliberate, Self-confident, and Methodical
  • Among types least likely to suffer heart disease and cardiac problems
  • Least likely of all the types to believe in a higher spiritual power
  • One of two types with the highest college GPA
  • Among types with highest income
  • Personal values include Achievement
  • Of all types, least likely to state that they value Home/family, Financial security, Relationships & Friendships, and Community Service
  • Overrepresented among MBA students and female small business owners
  • Commonly found in scientific or technical fields, computer occupations, and legal professions
  • Best book for INTJ: The 48 Laws of Power (by Robert Greene)

amazon

INTP

  • On personality trait measures, score as Candid, Ingenious, Complicated, Independent and Rebellious
  • More likely than other types to study a foreign language
  • Most frequent type among college students committing alcohol and drug policy violations
  • Have lowest level of coping resources of all the types (with ISTPs)
  • One of types least likely to believe in a higher spiritual power
  • Highest of all types in career dissatisfaction (with INFPs)
  • In school, have lower grades than would be predicted from aptitude scores
  • More likely than average complete engineering programs
  • Personal values include Autonomy, Freedom, and Independence
  • Overrepresented among working MBA students
  • Commonly found in science and technical occupations
  • Best book for INTP: Predictably Irrational (by Dan Ariely)

ISFJ

  • On personality trait measures, score as Conservative, Conventional, Guarded, and Reserved
  • Among types most likely to believe in a higher spiritual power
  • More likely than average to experience chronic pain
  • Among types most likely to suffer heart disease
  • Second most common type among education majors in college
  • More likely than other types to watch more than 3 hours of television per day
  • Personal values include Happy family, Health, and Spirituality
  • Overrepresented among MBA students and male small business owners
  • Among three types with the lowest income
  • Commonly found in education, health care, and religious occupations
  • Best book for ISFJ: Self-Promotion for Introverts: The Quiet Guide of Getting Ahead (by Nancy Ancowitz)

ISFP

  • On personality trait measures, score as Easygoing
  • Among types most likely to report heart disease and hypertension
  • In college, likely to report low levels of assertiveness
  • In essays, projected themselves the fewest number of years into the future of all the types
  • Among the types least likely to stay in college
  • Most likely of all types to report stress associated with finances and children
  • In a national sample, likely to value a work environment which provides security, clear and simple instructions, and no expectation of extra work hours
  • Underrepresented among MBA students and small business owners
  • Commonly found in occupations in health care, business, and law enforcement
  • Best book for ISFP: Self-Promotion for Introverts: The Quiet Guide of Getting Ahead (by Nancy Ancowitz)

ISTJ

  • On personality trait measures, score as Calm, Stable, Steady, Cautious, and Conventional
  • More likely than other types to experience cardiac problems and hypertension
  • More likely than other types to experience chronic pain
  • Among four highest types in college GPA
  • More frequent among African Americans
  • Personal values include Financial Security
  • Most likely of all types to enjoy a work environment where everything is done by the book.
  • Overrepresented among bank officers, financial managers, MBA students, and small business owners
  • Often found careers in management, administration, law enforcement, and accounting
  • Best book for ISTJ: Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ (by Daniel Goleman)

ISTP

  • On personality trait measures, score as Critical, Detached, Guarded, Independent, and Resourceful
  • Commonly found in populations of male college scholarship athletes
  • More likely than other types to suffer cardiac
  • Lowest ranked of all types in using social coping resources
  • One of four types least satisfied with their marriage or intimate relationship
  • Among types least likely to complete college
  • Personal values include Autonomy; at work, value Stability, Security, Independence, and Achievement
  • Commonly found in skilled trades, technical fields, agriculture, law enforcement, and military occupations
  • Best book for ISTP: How to Win Friends & Influence People (by Dale Carnegie)

ENFJ

  • On personality trait scales, scored as Active, Pleasant, Social, Demanding, Impatient, Appreciative, and Compromising
  • Most likely of all types to cope with stress by exercising
  • Most likely of all types to believe in a higher spiritual power
  • Ranked by psychologists as among least likely to have trouble in school.
  • Personal values include Friendships, Education & Learning, Creativity, and Community Service
  • Among types highest in job satisfaction, but also among the most likely to report plans to leave their jobs
  • Commonly found in careers in religion, teaching and the arts
  • Best book for ENFJ: Authentic Happiness (by Martin Seligman)

ENFP

  • On personality trait scales, scored as Enthusiastic, Outgoing, Spontaneous, Changeable, Impulsive, Energetic, and Understanding
  • Scored among highest of all types in available resources for coping with stress
  • ENFP women are less likely to suffer from heart disease
  • ENFP men are less likely to suffer from chronic pain
  • Rated by psychologists as among most likely of all types to have trouble in school
  • Overrepresented among academically talented elementary school teachers
  • Personal values include Home & family, Friendships, Creativity, Learning and Community Service
  • Commonly found in careers in counseling, teaching, religion and the arts
  • Best book for ENFP: Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience (by Mihaly Csikszentmihaly)

ENTJ

  • On personality trait measures, score as Ambitious, Forceful, Optimistic, Egotistical, Adaptable, and Energetic
  • Least likely of all types to report stress resulting from work or finances
  • More likely than average to suffer cardiac problems
  • Among the least likely of all types to believe in a higher spiritual power
  • Among top types in college GPA
  • Among most likely to stay in college
  • Personal values include Home/Family, Achievement, Creativity, and Learning
  • Overrepresented among MBA students and small business owners
  • One of two types most likely to be satisfied with their work
  • Best book for ENTJ: Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (by Robert Cialdini)

ENTP

  • On personality trait scales, scored as Enterprising, Friendly, Resourceful, Heading, Self-centered, and Independent
  • Least likely of all types to suffer heart disease and hypertension
  • Least likely of all types to report stress associated with family and health
  • Scored among highest of all types in available resources for coping with stress
  • Overrepresented among those with Type A behavior
  • Among highest of all types on measures of creativity
  • One of two types most frequent among violators of college alcohol policy
  • Among types most dissatisfied with their work, despite being among the types with the highest income
  • Commonly found in careers in science, management, technology and the arts
  • Best book for ENTP: The 4-Hour Workweek (by Tim Ferris)

ESFJ

  • Underrepresented among people suffering from substance abuse
  • Among types highest in resources for coping with stress
  • Second most likely of all types to report believing in a higher spiritual power
  • Highest of all types in reported satisfaction with their marriage or intimate relationship
  • Among most likely of all types to stay in college
  • Most likely of all types to be satisfied with their co-workers
  • Values at work include clear structure, security, and the ability to be of service to others
  • Among the types most satisfied with their work
  • Commonly found in careers in education, health care, and religion
  • Best book for ESFJ: How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (by Dale Carnegie)

ESFP

  • On personality trait measures, score as Changeable, Energetic, Forceful, Initiating, and Resourceful
  • More likely to use emotional coping techniques over spiritual or physical resources
  • Tend to look to authority in education rather than expressing intellectual curiosity; prefer hands-on learning
  • Among most likely to stay in college
  • More likely than other types to watch television for more than 3 hours a day
  • Second highest of all types in marital satisfaction
  • Among types with lowest income
  • At work, tend to be satisfied with co-workers but dissatisfied with job security, stress, salary, and accomplishment
  • Personal values include Home/Family, Health, Friendships, Financial Security, and Spirituality
  • Overrepresented in health care, teaching, coaching, and child care occupations
  • Best book for ESFP: What Color is Your Parachute? (by Richard Bolles)

ESTJ

  • On personality trait measures, likely to score as Contented, Energetic, Prejudiced, Self-Satisfied, and Practical
  • More likely than other types to exhibit Type A behavior
  • Of all types, scored highest in coping resources (with ENFP)
  • Ranked 3rd highest in marital satisfaction among all types
  • Among top four types in college GPA
  • Least likely of all types to think about suicide in college
  • Among most likely to stay in college
  • Among types most satisfied with their work
  • High-ranking personal values include Health, Financial Security, Achievement, and Prestige
  • Overrepresented among bank officers, financial managers, and business owners
  • Best book for ESTJ: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (by Stephen Covey)

ESTP

  • On personality trait measures, score as Dominant, Flexible, Demanding, and Sociable
  • More frequent among patients suffering from chronic pain
  • One of four types reporting highest levels of assertiveness in college
  • One of two types with lowest college GPA
  • Among most likely of all types to stay in college
  • Values at work include autonomy, variety, independence, and structure
  • Overrepresented among MBA students
  • Commonly found in careers in marketing, skilled trades, business, and law enforcement
  • Best book for ESTP: What Color is Your Parachute? (by Richard Bolles)

My Recommended Resources for MBTI

1. I’m Not Crazy, I’m Just Not You: The Real Meaning of the 16 Personality Types

While not strictly an introductory book, it is an easy read for the lay person with an interest in learning about Personality Types and applying it to every day situations at home or work. Roger Pearman is one of the giants in the field of teaching practical applications of the MBTI & Myer’s Personality Type.

2. Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type

The original book, by the creator of the MBTI, that explains the Myers & Briggs personality types typology and celebrates the diversity of personality types. While other books and booklets are possibly a better intro for the “type newbie,” I look on this book as a required reference on Personality Type . . . as it was completed near the end of Isabel’s life and thus contains the summation of a lifetime exploring differences in personality types.

3. LifeKeys: Discover Who You Are

Sandra Hirsch and Jane Kise have developed an introduction to MBTI Personality Types that is integrated with a spiritual message and applications especially relevant to the Christian and faith-based Communities.

4. Do What You Are: Discover the Perfect Career for You Through the Secrets of Personality Type

Very popular and durable career book, based on MBTI Personality Types, by Paul and Barbara Barron Tieger. It has been updated for newly emerging careers. Useful for self-study or as an aid to career counseling professionals.


  • Stan Priebe

    Interesting. I’m 68 and have spent the last 37 years in Information technology. I only recently found out I’m INFJ. My passion has been teaching biblical principles through writing. Had I been ID’d as an INFJ many years ago I often wonder if my passion would have been my career.

  • Tara Porter-Livesay

    Loved this – do you know about the Enneagram?

  • Thanks Paul. I appreciated this, and will share with my team at work as we have done the MBTI, Strengthfinders and Stand Out as a team in the past. Appreciate it!

  • It’s been a few years since I did the test, so just looked at the basic descriptions on the MB website. I think I’m fairly even in a couple of the categories and could go either way but placed myself as ESFJ. I love the description that says “commonly found in careers in education, health care and religion”. I’m the office manager at my church as well as a certified holistic health coach! (And wanted to be a teacher while growing up!) Thanks for this great post, Paul!

  • Mark Rhodes

    Evidently the experts also won’t tell you that the theory of psychological types did not originate with Myers-Briggs, but with Carl Jung. Jung was the discoverer of this aspect of human nature and laid out the theory and formed the practical foundation of what each of the 16 types is about in his book “Psychological Types”. Myers-Briggs took Jung’s work, expanded slightly on it, but otherwise created a system for making Jung’s theory of psychological type easier to work with for the average person, which is what the MBTI is – a tool for allowing the average person to access the benefits of Jung’s insights without having to take on the dense, academic, scientific writing of Jung’s.

    • Vicki Brown

      What makes you think the experts won’t tell you this?

      I would. You did. 🙂

    • Michael Murphy

      Any qualified practitioner of the MBTI will tell you about Jung’s groundbreaking work. He identified eight “function-attitudes” (e.g., extraverted feeling, introverted thinking, etc.) and it was Myers and Briggs who added the J/P (Judging/Perceiving) preference.

  • Catherine Williams

    I give the MBTI on a regular basis to people in my counseling practice and frequently conduct leadership workshops utilizing the MBTI. Most of the information in this blog post is commonly available so I’m not sure I understand the title (“What Experts Will Never Tell you About Your Myers-Briggs Personality Type”). Who are the experts that are withholding information?

    • Vicki Brown

      Not the people who are certified to give the MBTI. Not if they’re doing it correctly. 🙂

  • Salina Lazarus

    I took this test and found out I’m an INFJ, though after that I would often get confused on whether I was an INFP or and INFJ since the differences between them aren’t that noticeable unless you look for it. I then took a INFP or INFJ test and found out I’m 53% INFJ and 47% INFP. It’s only a 6% difference so I often find myself having qualities from both types, but I can confirm I’m more of an INFJ (even if it’s only by 6% lol)

    • dazy

      it’s funny because i took at test like that and I got 53% infp and 47% infj

  • Lois B. Levy

    This is wonderful. I have been using the instrument since the late 70s and I don’t expect to see something that’s “new,” but this is really great.

  • Sources?

  • Amberly

    This is very interesting, and applies to me as well! I’m an INTJ, and I always strive to know more facts about my type. Ya know, since I’m basically an alien on my own planet. 😛

  • Orochimaru “Joseph Joestar” Jr

    Funny how, as an ISTP, this is mostly negative